How to get in touch with any journalist

How to: Get in touch with (almost) any journalist

Monday morning, 10am, you've got a great story/idea but so do thousands of other people. 

As you check your email inbox when you sit down to begin the day and see 5, 10 maybe more unread emails as well as 5, 10 or more things on your to do list. 

Some Media Producers and journalists have the same amount to do, squared. So you need a way to bypass the layers around them and get in front of their eyes ASAP.


How? Here's a few marketing tips to help you. Well first off, avoid the 'contact us' page, unless it's a small blog/publication.

It may look inviting but if you send your message to a large media outlet e.g. The Guardian it's highly likely to get lost among the hundreds of similar messages. 


You may get lucky, a small number of media professionals have it front and centre on their websites but most don't. 

What they do have is their names on their websites, in their video credits or in their articles. A lot of the time that's all you'll need. So how do you actually get a direct email address from a journalist?

Option 1 - Use Social Media Bios

Media producers often put their email in their social media bios. A lot of journalists also have a strong presence on Twitter in particular. 

Head over to search.twitter.com and search for the media professionals name. Most of the time the journalist you're looking for will be the first result. 

If that doesn't work, try...

Option 2 - Use an Email Format Tool

Head to hunter.io type the URL of the organisation e.g. www.bbc.co.uk into the search bar on the home page. The results will give you the way that your target organisation constructs their employee's email addresses.

For example, if you know that the BBC has an email format is firstname.surname@bbc.co.uk and you're looking for a journalist called Joe Johnson it's a good chance that his email is joe.johnson@bbc.co.uk If that doesn't work you can always try...

Option 3 -Cold Calling

In the case of large media organisations, if you can't find any contact details call the publication/broadcaster and ask to be put through to a department that covers your niche. 

For newspapers these are called "desks" e.g. culture desk or lifestyle desk. 

When you are connected, do not pitch your story. Just ask for the name and contact details for the journalist who is most likely to cover your area of interest. 99% of the time they'll be happy to give you this information. 


Good Luck!

Until next time

The BuzzRamp Team